Another example of the disfunctionality of current patent mechanisms for drugs

While patents have been a boon to the pharma industry, it is arguable whether it serves the general public. Some examples can be seen in this excellent article from the NYT: Why Drugs Cost So Much

"Companies are taking advantage of a mix of laws that force insurers to include essentially all expensive drugs in their policies, and a philosophy that demands that every new health care product be available to everyone, no matter how little it helps or how much it costs. Anything else and we’re talking death panels.
Examples of companies exploiting these fault lines abound. An article in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall focused on how companies buy up the rights to old, inexpensive generic drugs, lock out competitors and raise prices. For instance, albendazole, a drug for certain kinds of parasitic infection, was approved back in 1996. As recently as 2010, its average wholesale cost was $5.92 per day. By 2013, it had risen to $119.58.
Novartis, the company that makes the leukemia drug Gleevec, keeps raising the drug’s price, even though the drug has already delivered billions in profit to the company. In 2001 Novartis charged $4,540, in 2014 dollars, for a month of treatment; now it charges $8,488. In its pricing, Novartis is just keeping up with other companies as they charge more and more for their drugs. They know we can’t say no.
"

I’d add that forcing into the law that expanded Medicare drug coverage a clause forbidding price negotiation was one of the worst examples of crony capitalism, which could be called stupid if it were actually concerned with the health of the population.

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